Origami with JavaScript. An amazing study of color and folds.

If you’ve ever sat and tried to figure out the math behind geometric folds? It’s an incredibly tricky process! With this Origami Study Yuin Chien has created a beautiful digital representation of the folds, and colors of origami.

In her own words, the project is:

A series of visual study exploring origami compositions and colors, hoping to give forms to personal memories and poetic imagination.

Yuin has written a little about the process on her blog and also shown off some stunning renderings, showing off how quickly the complexity of the folded shapes grows as you fold more and more.

You’ll also notice some nifty controls in the top right corner, allowing you to add extra folds, and play with the fillings! These are built with an amazingly versatile interface tool, called Dat.Gui which is always good to have in your back pocket for all your upcoming projects!

More like this?

This is interactive poetry at its best.

Thibaud Goiffon is a French student studying graphic & interactive design. His project, Intimacy, shows off an amazing spark of creativity and an ability to make curiously fun web toys!

Intimacy itself, is, in its creator’s words:

A short poem, composed of images, sounds and texts.

It really delivers on that promise. Each sketch has its own unique feel; often combining specific reactive animations, surprising interactive components, and quirky sounds.

What have people been making?

The best of PlotterTwitter, February 2020.

February has come and gone, and since it’s a leap year, 29 days have gone with it. Twenty-nine wonderful days of my favorite Twitter hashtag, #PlotterTwitter.

As with January, here’s another round-up of amazing artists & pen plottings, alongside any other commentary/algorithm I can spot within the works!

Straversi printed off an elevation map of SF in brilliant detail, using this fantastic open source tool that was built on top of Mapbox.

Joseph Wilk is doing some amazing work, hooking the axidraw up to an airbrush. With liquid ink, the outcome is intricate and super random.

Michelle Chandra created some spirographic patterns that remind me of the Mystify screensaver on my old Windows PC. The white ink on black paper is stunning.

Spongenuity created incredible multi-colored, multi-layered portraits that use flow fields in their fill pattern.

Sladix plotted reaction diffusion patterns with great results!

Neil Jenkins plotted archimedian spirals with images behind them, creating intricate mesmerizing plots!

More Please!

Create your own art by tinkering with this machine's wacky controls.

A lot of generative artists show off their creations with some clever curation tools that allow you to make small adjustments. This project is a great expansion on that idea.

Tinkersynth is a generative art machine, in the literal sense, modeled after a synth. With the artwork on the left and a set of special tools on the right, you can tweak each slider to change different aspects of the art.

Tinkersynth encourages you to play with it and discover how each of the tools works—just like how you might learn how to use an actual synth for the first time. Each icon means something different, and you’ll need to play with each and every one before you feel ready to leave the page.

In the words of the creator, Joshua Comeau:

Tinkersynth prioritizes being delighted by unexpected effects rather than creating an intuitive, predictable tool.

If the joy of creating artwork isn’t enough, Tinkersynth is full of secrets and easter eggs that will keep you exploring. Each of the sliders and inputs is a delight to use. They all obey the law that every action has an equal and opposite reaction.

More about the artworks and code

A side-project about butts. No more, no less.

I’ve always been a fan of the weirder side-projects that’re out there.

They take you out of your comfort zone, out of your work zone, and put you in a special place where you can explore anything and everything in the world.

One morning, Pablo Stanley woke up and decided to embark on a side-project adventure. That journey was the creation of buttsss.com.

In Pablo’s own words:

I doubted myself at every step, with a voice in my head telling me, “Butts? Pablo, this is terrible. Stop!”

Buttsss is not only a creative outlet, but also the world’s fullest and most complete collection of illustrated butts. From the Triple Butt and Space Butt all the way to the UX Butt and the Business Butt, they’re all accounted for!

Butt I haven't had enough.

The best of PlotterTwitter, January 2020.

Well, January is almost over and it’s time for a recap of one of my favorite Twitter hashtags: #PlotterTwitter.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with #PlotterTwitter, it’s a place for people to show off their plotter art. It has become an incredibly creative space with everyone able to see each other work and expand upon it.

And so here we are, a little recap of some of the best works in January’s #PlotterTwitter!

Netpraxis created some very nice designs using moiré patterns which are complex patterns that emerge by overlaying two simple patterns on top of each other. They can look endlessly complex and simple at the same time.

Julien Gachadoat created some super clean, mechanical-esque plots. I haven’t really seen anything like it.

Showing that you can find inspiration anywhere, Ruud de Rooij plotted out every single way to cross a road 7 times without crossing over your path.

Tyler Hobbs used a plotter to draw outlines of circles, and then painted the colors in by hand.

Louis Hoebregts recreated some Keith Haring works with a creative grid of swirls.

Yuin Chien plotted out 2D renderings of folded paper based on origami diagrams. With beautiful colored markers on black paper, they truly pop out of the page.

More! Give me more!